Monday, May 26, 2014

YELLOW/NAVY/MUSIC/ART


Greetings!
It's no secret that I love to sew, and love a challenge:

When Style Arc produced a dress pattern bearing a close resemblance to this famous dress:


who was I to resist?

A piece of navy linen from the stash, add a small white leftover, and Voila!


I know, it is almost Winter, and this is a Summer dress...
but nature is helping out here, as we are having another mini heat wave -
expected to break all known records for May this week, with forecast maximums of 27/28 deg C.  
As Mr C. and I like to say 'It's the end of Civilisation as we know it!!'

Climate variations have become strange indeed.


Undeterred by this climactic turn of events, I gave the old navy lace dress another outing to a symphony concert, in company with my new screamingly bright yellow pom pom pashmina.  
They enjoyed 'Poet of the Guitar' almost as much as the Cardinals.


The 'poet' was the extraordinary German-born Australian classical guitarist Karin Schaupp [b.1972].  Based in Brisbane, Schaupp and her family migrated to Australia when she was aged eight.  Taught by her mother Isolde Schaupp, she was winning international competitions in her teens, and, at 18,  performed Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez with the Queensland Philharmonic Orchestra.  To our delight, she performed it this week with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra.  Wonderful!

Karin Schaupp tours extensively in many countries, has made many recordings, and had several guitar concertos written especially for her.



Coles have Granny Smith apples on special.
Apple crumble, anyone?




The brown shaded area, in the north-west desert of South Australia, known as the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjajara (A.P.Y.) lands, is the traditional tribal homeland of the Pitjantjatjara people of the Central Australian desert.


About 4,000 people live in scattered settlements, including the Amata Community (above), the location of Tjala Arts, a leader in the contemporary Western Desert painting movement.
The artists, mostly women, produce the most vibrant, joyous, exuberant abstract imagery, adapted from their traditional symbols and concepts:

PUNU, 2011, Ruby Tjangawa Williamson and Wawiriya Burton 
In Punu, Williamson and Burton depict two trees - ultukumpu and kalingkalingpa - from the country where they were born near Irrunytju community in Western Australia.  This is their first collaboration.


Seven sisters and Tjala Tjukurpa (Honey Ant Dreaming) 2012, Paniny Mick and her daughters.
 Much of the painting is trans-generational collaboration, with grandmothers, their daughters and grandchildren, working together as traditional knowledge is passed on to the younger generation.
In Honey Ant Dreaming, Paniny Mick and her daughters depict two important stories.  Tjala Tjukurpa tells of the ancestral honey ant whose tracks wind through the Amata valley, and the Seven Sisters Dreaming refers to the constellations Pleiades and Orion.  The sisters are Pleiades and Orion is Nyiru, a man who lusts after the sisters and is forever chasing them. 

   
Mingkiri Tjukurpa (Mice Dreaming) 2011; Wawiriya Burton, Angela Burton, Maureen Douglas.
Wawiriya Burton (b.1925), a traditional healer and senior woman of Anangu law and culture, has painted a story about small female mice found in the desert.  The mice are pregnant, and after giving birth to many babies they must search for food and water to feed the young.  The dotted lines are mouse tracks in the sand.

Ngayuku ngura (My country) Puli murpu (Mountain range) 2012;  Ruby Tjangawa Williamson, her daughter Nita, and grandaughter Suzanne Armstrong.
Williamson, her daughter and granddaughter, have painted their mountain country near Amata where women engage in ceremonial business.  Different colours and designs represent variations in the landscape.

This large and brilliantly coloured painting is my favourite of the series of seven works commissioned by GOMA from the Tjala women artists.  
The paintings are currently on display as part of an exhibition entitled 
Terrain: Indigenous Australian objects and representations.  

 Go see it!


 In other artistic news, our grandson in Canada made this colourful collage as a Mother's Day gift for our dear daughter... 
To our eyes, it is perfection :-)

Have a great week
XXXX










34 comments:

  1. Hello Patricia,

    How clever of you to have created your own version of 'that dress'. The Navy and White looks great, definitely a colour combination that never tires. And, how we love the navy dress teamed with the bright yellow Pom Pom wrap. Fabulous.

    The concert sounds to have been wonderful. So exciting when such a young performer reaches a world class standard.

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    1. Thank you Jane and Lance, I have always like navy, and am happy it seems to be enjoying renewed popularity. Brisbane is very proud of Karin Schaupp, a wonderful artist.

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  2. Once again Patricia, you have created a most beautiful dress. I do indeed think you most clever.
    Would have loved to hear Karin play.
    The Aborigines are the most interesting of people.
    Their works are so elaborate . I love the way they tell their stories with through their art. How I wish , I could return one day Betty.
    Thank you so much for this wonderful post.
    val x

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    1. Hello Val, I know you would have enjoyed the concert - the classical guitar reminds me of your part of the world. Yes, the contemporary Aboriginal art movement is really interesting. I would love to own a painting by Ruby Williamson: they are brilliant! xx

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  3. I love your dress, it's so sophisticated in navy and white and I bet it looks gorgeous on. Glad you enjoyed your evening at the symphony concert although I'm not sure if I've heard of Karin before. Thanks for the insight into Australian tribal families and their art. Your grandsons piece of artwork is great - a budding artist there maybe.
    Patricia x

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    1. Thank you Patricia, I'm planning to wear the dress tomorrow. It is a very flattering style, I find. Isn't it fun to see the little ones making art, and I smile to think this is just the beginning for my daughter - soon she will have storage problems for all the efforts of her two little boys! x

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  4. Nice post. I am now considering whether I can find something in screaming yellow to go with black and white - I love the idea but had never considered it before. But I think it would look good on me.

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    1. Thank you Jenny. Screaming yellow is a good colour with black and white. As long as you don't mind standing out in the crowd :)

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  5. Patricia, I've learned so many things from your blog today! And am just hearing about Karin Schaupp for the first time! Thanks for the enlightenment!

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    1. Hello Debra, I'm sure Karin will go on to greater fame on the international scene. Not only talented but gorgeous too. She wore a fabulous long full-skirted gown with a red sash which fell out into a train. Stunning!

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  6. Your dress turned out beautifully! You're a very talented seamstress. I hope you have more wintry weather soon, it sounds like it's still quite hot there. This artwork is amazing, thank you for sharing it. It's not dissimilar from Native American art in my area, actually. I find that very interesting. The collage is beautiful, they did a lovely job with it. I hope you have a great week, Patricia.

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    1. Thank you Jennifer, I am pleased with the dress. I can sew for myself, but am hopeless trying to do it for other people. I just keep pinning and tacking until I get it right. I can see what you mean about the similarities in our indigenous artists' work, and I also have observed it in the music of both cultures.

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  7. Firstly I hope that you love wearing your new dress - it is very nice, I just hope that you get the right weather for it! Your yellow pashmina is beautiful too. All of those artworks are amazing, they are so unusual. Of course the best one is the collage at the end!! xx

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    1. I think I will enjoy this dress, which has a very flattering line, Amy. Spotted that yellow pashmina recently and loved it at first sight. I went back a few days later and it was still there - I did wonder about my own taste a bit, as hundred of people must have been past and not been interested... I'll have to order one of those collages for myself from our grandson :)

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  8. I love your version of Kate's dress! In fact, I like it better in the navy than the original yellow. I'm glad it's warm enough you will get a chance to wear it. The concert sounds like it was a wonderful experience, and the art work is hauntingly beautiful. Love the collage your grandson made!

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    1. The dress looks good in navy, Kristie, so I am glad I tried it. Hope to wear it at least once before winter sets in.
      Those paintings from Amata are my current favourites on the indigenous art scene!

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  9. Dear Patricia - you are so talented with your dressmaking, the navy and white and the yellow stole look very smart.
    I love classical guitar and have been lucky enough to hear both Julian Bream, and John Williams in concert.
    The work done by the Indigenous Australian women is really vibrant, and colourful - I would happily give them space on my walls.

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    1. Thank you Rosemary, I admit to sewing for the creative outlet rather than necessity these days, but it's good to have a hobby!
      The classical guitar concert was my first in this genre - and I really loved it. Yes, I'd give wall space to one of those paintings too; I'd really like one of Ruby Williamson's works but they are being snapped up by the major galleries these days.

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  10. Patricia,
    First off, I wanted to tell you that Nel has that same white tray in your first picture. Isn't it unique? I love Kate's yellow dress, and I can't believe you made one just like it.......talented you. It was interesting to hear about the mice tracks found in the desert. Do you know that I have a terrible fear of mice - Yikes! The collage that your grandson made for his mom is so special. I still have many things that the kids made me when they were little, and I will never part with them. They are my treasures.

    It's Memorial Day here, and spending a quiet day at home.

    love,
    ~Sheri

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    1. Aw, that is nice that Nel has that white tray. I love mine, and have it out as a display area most of the time. I loved the yellow dress too, and when a pattern appeared I had to have it. I'm not too fond of mice either, Sheri, but fear slimy critters like worms even more! My daughter will no doubt acquire quite a collection of children's art pieces, just like we did. xx

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  11. I was wondering if you had been to these communities recently, then I thought not, because you have recently been unwell. It's years since I have been through. I don't think the artists get a great deal from the dealers, even though aboriginal art became very popular.

    Your new dress is lovely - much prefer the navy and white that you made.

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    1. Hi Sarah Liz, I have never been out into the central desert, but I would absolutely love to. Even if we made it to Uluru, I doubt we'd ever get to the Pitjantjatjara lands. However, I can view the works online, and maybe I'll manage to buy one some time. Yes, there are issues with the sale and production of the art, but that is a whole other story... Glad you like my navy/white dress, and I have to say I am pleased with it.

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  12. Oh I do like the look of your new dress, I have always loved Aboriginal art work.

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    1. Thank you! I love the contemporary Aboriginal art work too; so vibrant and colourful.

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  13. You are very clever Trish. Your navy number is gorgeous as is your pashmina! Love the magnificent art works by our indigenous artists. Looks like a little budding artist in the family in Canada xx

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    1. You know I can never resist a bright new colour Michelle, whether in fabric to wear, or art to admire! Little Canada guy seems to like the bright and shiny too :) xx

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  14. I like your Kate Dress. It looks classy and elegant and fun with that give-me-my-sunglasses pashmina!
    re the Aboriginal art..is it awful of me to want to get 'Mice Dreaming' made up as a fabric..painted silk...

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    1. Thanks Val, I wonder if anyone will pick up where the design comes from when I wear it.
      Yes - that painting would make beautiful silk. Brilliant idea. Maybe you could do a deal with the Tjala Arts?

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  15. Your dress turned out perfectly, sorry to hear you are still having heat though. I truly loved looking at the Tjala Arts photo's. They are wonderful, so colorful and thanks for giving us the details of the meaning or inspiration behind each one.

    Darla

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    1. Thank you Darla. Tjala Arts has become my new favourite art style and centre. I'll be looking out to buy a piece if I can.

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  16. You are so clever with your sewing! I recently tried to make something to wear and it turned out so badly that I tore it up in disgust...lol :) The scraps are now awaiting a re-invention into something else! Wonderful post. Suzy x

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    1. Hi Suzy, thank you, and I love it when my sewing turns out well. However, I also have to consign a few items to the Land of Stuff Ups! They wait in a big round basket under my sewing table, and eventually they too get re-invented. Sometimes they become the muslin for the next experiment. xx

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  17. Gosh - your country, everything about it is as colorful as You.
    So different from our light palette.
    Naturally I like your pom-pom pashmina as I have a similar, only in black.
    I bet you look stunning!
    Is there a broken cup in the collage made by your grandson? If so, cute & so clever : )!

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    1. Bright light = bright colours in our part of Australia, Mette.
      I enjoy the delicate light when we visit Canada, similar latitudes to you, and a nice change for us. A black pashmina similar to mine would be gorgeous - I love black, too. And, yes, I believe that is a broken cup in the collage. I wonder if he broke it himself? :)

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